Posts by Aethior

    Diff
    - <item name="wcf.acp.menu.link.paidSubscription.list"><![CDATA[List Paid Subscriptions]]></item>
    + <item name="wcf.acp.menu.link.paidSubscription.list"><![CDATA[Paid Subscriptions]]></item>
    Diff
    - <item name="wcf.acp.menu.link.paidSubscription.user.list"><![CDATA[List Active Subscriptions]]></item>
    + <item name="wcf.acp.menu.link.paidSubscription.user.list"><![CDATA[Active Subscriptions]]></item>
    Diff
    - <item name="wcf.acp.menu.link.paidSubscription.transactionLog.list"><![CDATA[List Transactions]]></item>
    + <item name="wcf.acp.menu.link.paidSubscription.transactionLog.list"><![CDATA[Transactions]]></item>

    Yes, justified text is a problem in browsers. It's an aesthetic problem, but it's also a big problem for persons with vision problems. But... I like use the justified text in some cases, and I think the option should be available in the editor.


    (...) A combination of the first two points make justified text difficult to read by dyslexic users. The uneven white space creates a distraction which can easily make you lose your place. As web designers we spend time testing in different browsers to make sure as many people as possible can view the website as intended. Around 10% of the UK population are affected by dyslexia to some degree, so making a website that is difficult for 10% of users to read is obviously a bad idea!


    Visually impaired users often use screen magnifiers to enlarge text to a suitable level. Many magnifiers work by enlarging the area around your mouse. Because the large uneven spaces are also magnified it can become difficult for the to follow the words with their magnifying software. Instead of following the flow of words along even spacing, users have to find the start of each new word.


    The Royal National Institute of Blind people (RNIB) strongly recommend websites do not use justified text. Modern websites are all about the user. There was a time websites were created to look good on the creators screen, not necessarily other users. Websites we not tested thoroughly to make sure all users can access the content. Times have changed and accessibility and usability are very important factors in modern website development. Doing anything that excludes or hinders certain users, reduces the audience and therefore the overall success of a website.

    This error appears sometimes when I delete a media provider, but I can't to reproduce in a test installation.


    It works perfectly now! Thanks @SoftCreatR. ;)


    Only one note. I added all the original style to the iframe.


    Code
    <iframe id='audio_{$ID}' frameborder='0' allowfullscreen='' scrolling='no' height='200' style='border:1px solid #EEE; box-sizing:border-box; width:100%;' src="https://www.ivoox.com/player_ej_{$ID}_4_1.html"></iframe>

    Example:


    Link
    http://www.ivoox.com/catastrofe-ultravioleta-01-expedicion-audios-mp3_rf_2933514_1.html


    Iframe

    Code
    <iframe id='audio_2933514' frameborder='0' allowfullscreen='' scrolling='no' height='200' style='border:1px solid #EEE; box-sizing:border-box; width:100%;' src="https://www.ivoox.com/player_ej_2933514_4_1.html?c1=ff6600"></iframe>

    Maybe my question is stupid but... when the people use these buttons? The most common situation is after a data importation, right? In a full installation there are 19 buttons. Why not more simple buttons? Rebuild Board (forums, threads and posts), Rebuild Blog (blogs and entries), Rebuild Calendar (calendar and events), Rebuild Gallery (images and albums), Rebuild Filebase (files and versions), Rebuild Conversations (conversations and messages), Rebuild Statistics, Rebuild Users, Rebuild Search Index (general).


    I don't understand this function correctly? Is better (19) buttons for every action than (9) buttons per category?


    Edit. When I have to rebuild data I press all buttonss in order without read the name or description. XD