• Looks like they don't even know how they plan to enforce it yet on site owners.

    That will be up to local authorities.


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    What if I posted I'm homeless with no fixed address - can they prove otherwise when they have no idea who I am because the sites domain uses whois protection?

    A judge will likely compel your provider / domain registrar to hand out your payment details to local law enforcement.

    "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" — Leonard Nimoy

  • A judge will likely compel your provider / domain registrar to hand out your payment details to local law enforcement.

    And what a joke. Yeah, I doubt they would take it to court in-front of a judge just to get a site owners real address unless there is something seriously wrong going on with that site. Judges have better things to do, like dealing with crime - than deal with chasing up a site owners name and address details. It's only going happen that if there's something bad going on with the site in question.


    Anyone could just post their homeless with no fixed address, let them go chasing courts for it.

  • Getting a search warrant does not involve big court sessions. It just has to be signed by a judge. That how legal systems work, law enforcement does not simply do their bidding, they observe due process. Doesn't mean that there is a big deliberation at court.


    I disagree with your assessment that its only going to happen when something bad is going to happen. When the TMG (a privacy law) was adopted in Germany, many lawyers would just search websites that did not comply with it (had an incomplete legal notice) to issue written warnings, often quite costly for the site owner. There are a lot of reasons people just want to piss on someone else, and not complying with the GDPR will mean you are an easy target for anyone who wants to piss on your parade.

    "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" — Leonard Nimoy

  • It's great that they think everyone is going to be upfront and post their name and address on their site. But the reality is though, anyone who's used the web for long enough knows it's a bad idea. More so, if you run something like a forum that's open easy to making enemies of disgruntled members you might ban.


    For instance on what you said, I can use any address really and they'd have no idea if it was false or real. Not unless they can tap into the privacy details used with the domain registrar, which I can't see that happening because of the privacy act. They can't just ask "anyone" for personal details like that and be given it. And what reason would they have to check if an address given is false or true, what they going to do, double check every site on the web, that is never going to happen.


    New forums gets started "everyday" on the web, do you think they can keep up with that, or even have the manpower to check every site on the web.

  • It's great that they think everyone is going to be upfront and post their name and address on their site.

    Its already a reality in certain countries. In Germany, you have the so called "Impressumspflicht" / "Anbieterkennzeichnung". If you want to run a website in Germany, you already have to do this. This isn't some dream world, its already a tried and true practice. One that works.


    But the reality is though, anyone who's used the web for long enough knows it's a bad idea.

    Is it, though? Experience from my own country show that is not. It works, and has for a very long time. The original law from 1530 (yes, the original law dates back to the Reichstag of the Holy Roman Empire) was made more concrete for online communication on 22th July, 1997 as "Teledienstgesetz" and was reformed on March 1st, 2007 by the "Telemediengesetz". For More then two decades now Germans have had to have their names on the legal notice if they wanted to run a website. Experience shows that it is absolutely possible to so so without getting stalked and harassed. Abuse of the information provided in the legal notice is a crime.


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    New forums gets started "everyday" on the web, do you think they can keep up with that, or even have the manpower to check every site on the web.

    They don't have to. Do you think every cars is constantly checked for driving violations? They aren't. Random controls paired with actions when violations are reported are more then enough incentive for most providers to adhere to the law.


    Because as you have pointed out, if you ban someone from your forum, the last thing you want is that he sues you for GDPR violations. That is just an attack vector you don't want to have.

    "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" — Leonard Nimoy

  • Its already a reality in certain countries. In Germany, you have the so called "Impressumspflicht" / "Anbieterkennzeichnung". If you want to run a website in Germany, you already have to do this. This isn't some dream world, its already a tried and true practice. One that works.

    Yeah, you're already governed by strict German laws in place, so suppose this is nothing new to you really.


    But we don't all live in Germany and have also managed the way things are for us quite happily, without your laws or this GDPR. ;)

  • But we don't all live in Germany and have also managed the way things are for us quite happily, without your laws or this GDPR. ;)

    You'll get used to it.


    The GDPR is protection of privacy for users. The current debate about Facebook shows how necessary this is. Providers (Collectors or Processors in GDPR speech) of services on the other hand are held accountable. While we certainly "managed" without such a law, that doesn't mean everything worked out well. The problems with big data are ubiquitous, and this is a good first step in the right direction.


    The GDPR applies not only to online data - it pertains to all data (medical records, genetic information and much more), so it covers a whole range of things and improves privacy in many aspects of daily life, not only online communication.


    Its not the holy grail, far from it, and I do have my fair share of critique for it.

    "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" — Leonard Nimoy

  • The GDPR is protection of privacy for users.

    Which is odd if true that they want every site owner to list their name and address on a privacy policy page. How is that protecting a users privacy?


    You sure they stipulate that requirement for every site owner? Over on XenForo nobody is touching on that, as though it's not a requirement. In fact, over on that forum things are being said about it quite differently, some are even saying that small sites don't even need follow the GDPR.

  • Which is odd if true that they want every site owner to list their name and address on a privacy policy page. How is that protecting a users privacy?

    Because as a website owner, you are a service provider. You are not merely a user. The users of your website actually get protection from you in that case.

    "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" — Leonard Nimoy

  • But where does it state on GDPR website that "every site owner" has to list their Name and Address.


    i got that information listed on the article posted here about GDPR, but I have not seen anything posted about it on XenForo, and that GDPR site is not easy to understand anything they say on it with the technical jargon they use to say things.

  • Article 13, especially 1a).


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    Where personal data relating to a data subject are collected from the data subject, the controller shall, at the time when personal data are obtained, provide the data subject with all of the following information:

    1. the identity and the contact details of the controller and, where applicable, of the controller’s representative;

    You'll be hard pressed to run a website without collecting personal data, even the IP address stored in your server log counts. Controller means you as service provider here (its defined earlier in the text more precise).


    Article 12 (1) states:


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    The controller shall take appropriate measures to provide any information referred to in Articles 13 and 14 and any communication under Articles 15 to 22 and 34 relating to processing to the data subject in a concise, transparent, intelligible and easily accessible form, using clear and plain language, in particular for any information addressed specifically to a child. 2The information shall be provided in writing, or by other means, including, where appropriate, by electronic means. 3When requested by the data subject, the information may be provided orally, provided that the identity of the data subject is proven by other means.

    "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" — Leonard Nimoy

    Edited once, last by Netzwerg ().

  • some are even saying that small sites don't even need follow the GDPR.

    Some parts about record-keeping only apply to enterprises with more then 250 employes, yes. But most of the parts are relevant for everyone. If they think most parts don#t apply, they are grossly mistaken.

    "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" — Leonard Nimoy

  • I don't see anything in them sections that says you have to provide a home address. All all I see is it keep saying you have to provide contact details. That can be anything really, such as email address you list as contact details. It's not being specific about what kind of contact details is required.


    Says a name and contact details. List your name and email address, or a mobile number to contact


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    (a) the identity and the contact details of the controller and, where applicable, of the controller’s representative;

  • That can be anything really, such as email address you list as contact details. It's not being specific about what kind of contact details is required.

    Be aware that the legal definition of contact information is used here. IANAL, but the ones I have asked say that a postal address is required. That doesn't necessarily mean your home address, but it has to be a legal postal address (the german term is "ladungsfähige Anschrift", I have no idea how that translate in lawyer speak to english).

    "A life is like a garden. Perfect moments can be had, but not preserved, except in memory. LLAP" — Leonard Nimoy

  • Well NicoleSophie , since I just registered at your site and am unable to do absolutely anything there, including sending you a message either here or there, I don't think you'll have much to worry about with this new GDPR law.

    You make it practically impossible for anyone to join in at your place, so I don't know what you're so worked up about. Unless of course you have other forums/sites that I am not aware of.

  • I explained why new users are limited in what they can do on my site until moved into another group. Think yourself lucky you don't have to deal with the the same type of people I do joining, who only join to abuse everything on it (time and time again, for the last two years), Anyway, I replied to you saying I've moved you to the other group now because I know you from posting here.


    The way I run my site HAS TO BE RUN that way, and it won't change because of certain people. And you can't say you couldn't do anything. You could still post just the same, but all your posts was moderated until moved into another group. Nothing is stopping you from posting though, and you didn't need to use CONVO as a new member, there's a shoutbox you could have used to say anything unmoderated in it.


    By the way, you didn't even need join my site. "Guest" posting is enabled on all the Articles, and FileBase.

  • Well GTB , since I just registered at your site...

    You'll be sorry. GTB is worried about his personal information being available online and has no problem sharing other people's personal info. This thread is hilarious.

  • Paul (PJK) above is just one the people why I have to set the site up the way it is.


    So thank him for it, rather than join my forum and then come here moaning about it.

  • You'll be sorry. GTB is worried about his personal information being available online and has no problem sharing other people's personal info. This thread is hilarious.

    Don't be silly Paul, all I'm saying is that I don't want to post my home address on my site because of people like YOU and your mates on those other forums you all hang out on. Do you think I want people like you, and your crony mates knowing my home address

  • Don't be silly Paul, all I'm saying is that I don't want to post my home address on my site because of people like YOU and your mates on those other forums you all hang out on. Do you think I want people like you, and your crony mates knowing my home address

    A simple PO box resolves the issue most likely. In GB they average around $35 a month (from some basic research) and probably will have to be counted as a normal part of "doing business" running a forum like the hosting cost is.